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  • A Wiseguy's Secret to Successful Transplanting - The Westside Gardener
    upright solid citizen of this here republic Now close your yap and listen up A few hours before you re going to transplant it can be as much as a day ahead but no earlier here s what you gotta do You go into the kitchen see Get yourself a nice container go over to the sink and then fill it with water Then you take that water and water the plants you re going to be transplanting Yeah that s it Water em ahead of time And don t go pourin it in from the top let em soak it up from the bottom What s that You say you ve been told to water them right after transplanting Listen don t make me come upside your head That don t do no good Transplanting damages your plant s root hairs it just can t take up much water right afterward By watering ahead of time you make sure that plant is nice and hydrated That buys it some time to replace the damaged root system Trust me pallie You do what I say and I guarantee you won t lose many of your precious babies After all it

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2007/successful_transplanting.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Gravenstein Apple Blossoms - The Westside Gardener
    the morning paper I was struck by how pretty these apple blossoms were So I ran in the house and grabbed my camera I was able to grab a couple shots before my dogs noticed me Once that happened though no more photos were possible the branches were waving wildly thanks to the way those two bozos were jumping around Nikon D70 w 18 200mm lens 32mm at f 4

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/photos/gravenstein_blossoms.html (2016-04-27)
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  • A Late Blight Myth - The Westside Gardener
    tree root rots are quite happy staying and playing in the dirt However there is no good evidence that Late Blight can overwinter in our soil nor any evidence that it does so anywhere outside of its Mexican home range Late Blight spores need living tissue to survive around here It is able to overwinter in the Maritime Northwest though Unfortunately we have many Nightshade Solanum species in our area some of which are perennial Late Blight can infect at least some Solanums Additionally it is well documented that Late Blight can survive quite handily on potato tubers whether in the soil or in your root cellar through the winter I also have no doubt that an ample fresh supply of the fungus arrives every year as our local mega nurseries and home centers import tomato plants from mega growers in the southeastern United States Since the spores of this fungus can travel many miles through the air your garden plants have lots of chances to become infected From a practical perspective this distinction probably doesn t matter much to the gardener Just remember to practice good gardening habits If you use a sprinkler don t water in the evening

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2007/late_blight_myth.html (2016-04-27)
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  • My Favorite Seed Companies - The Westside Gardener
    Johnston founder of JSS for inspiration and help when he started Territorial Territorial Seed Company If Territorial sells it I know it has grown well at their trial grounds in Cottage Grove Oregon Their varieties for the summer garden are second to none but what makes them really indispensable to the maritime vegetable gardener is the seeds they sell for the winter garden A truly helpful group of great people The Cook s Garden This company located on the other side of the US but I have found their main season varieties to be quite well adapted to our climate Cook s has an amazing assortment of salad greens I am also impressed with some of their other unique offerings both heirlooms and new varieties In addition their pages are loaded with additional information for the home gardener Shepherd Ogden founded this company but sold it to Burpee in the late 1990s I ve been happy to see they remain committed to offering interesting vegetable varieties especially when it comes to the lettuces and other salad greens that made The Cook s Garden famous Nowadays I would be more careful about their heat loving crops though since Burpee is located

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/favorite_companies.html (2016-04-27)
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  • How to Build a PVC Hoophouse for your Garden - The Westside Gardener
    3 4 PVC joined with a PVC tee The other six hoops use the PVC crosses in place of the PVC tees Since I like to be able to move the hoophouse around the garden from season to season the joints are dry fit together no glue They seem to stay together especially if I use a rubber mallet to snug up all the connections Optional step I have found that the joints mentioned above are sturdier if I reinforce them internally by inserting a 1 foot length of 1 2 PVC through the joint These pieces seem to fit through a 3 4 PVC tee okay but you may have to drill out the PVC crosses in one direction using a 5 8 spading bit This can be tricky so be sure to clamp the cross down well BEFORE attempting to drill it out The two ends of each hoop slide easily over the 1 2 PVC stakes If the stakes aren t in the ground perfectly straight don t worry about it the pressure from the hoops tends to even out their alignment somewhat When setting up the hoops having that helper around REALLY makes things easier The next step is to connect the ridgeline Starting at one end of the hoophouse connect the hoops at the top using the 34 inch sections of 3 4 PVC As I go I like to use the rubber mallet to set each section as far into the connectors as possible Note that the ridgeline will be slightly shorter than 21 feet for increased stability Congratulations You have finished the frame The plastic sheeting can be secured to the frame in many ways 8 inch lengths of 1 inch black poly pipe can be slit lengthwise making clips which can hold the plastic onto the PVC frame A slightly more expensive solution is to use large binder clips which can be found at any office supply store I like to sandwich the sides of the plastic with 2x4 lumber screwed together When it gets windy this extra weight holds the plastic down much better than the clips alone All sorts of heat loving plants thrive in a hoophouse environment including tomatoes peppers and unfortunately in this case horsetail Making the Optional Ends This goes much easier if it s done before the frame is skinned with the 20 x25 plastic sheet Cut the 10 x25 piece of clear plastic to make two 10 x12 5 pieces Take one and lay it over one end hoop of the PVC hoophouse the 10 measurement should be vertical such that the hoop is completely covered but at least one foot of plastic is on the ground Use the poly pipe clips to secure this plastic end piece to the hoop Cut a slit down the middle to make the door There will be some excess plastic which can be cut off if desired That s it Repeat this at the other end of the

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/howto/hoophouse.html (2016-04-27)
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  • My First Winter Vegetable Garden - The Westside Gardener
    beginner and with a late start to boot After finding out that this was to be my first winter garden he personally made sure all the seeds were in stock and would go out that very afternoon I recall him making several trips to the seed warehouse during our conversation It was just a few days later that the seeds arrived I was so excited Since my summer garden was in full swing with no room allotted for the winter stuff I had to squeeze more rows into the available space I hadn t yet learned the advantages to raised beds Much of the new vegetables where a foot or less from the old vegetables but I was determined to make it work The vegetables sprouted and grew like mad I must ve read through the Territorial catalog several dozen times trying to absorb every possible nuance of culture for this new garden I waited impatiently longing for summer to end yes I was sick Finally summer turned to fall The beets and carrots were fighting for space and the kale was overshadowing everything within two or three feet of itself My sprouting broccoli plants were a couple feet tall and looking wonderful to my eyes I spent a good number of October weekends just sitting in my garden feeling proud of this accomplishment Then the first good frost hit I remember waking up and looking out my window first at the frosty grass then to my vegetable garden But something was wrong My plants were obviously dead I ran out there and wandered around the garden with a sick feeling inside What had I done wrong I had to go to work that day but I just felt horrible That evening as I drove home I ran through everything

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/1997/first_winter_garden.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Starting Seeds Indoors, Successfully - The Westside Gardener
    help us make more efficient use of our gardens by allowing us to give a head start to plants that can replace others in the garden whose useful life is ending Also since so much of the year is too cool for heat loving crops to thrive growing them indoors is the only practical way to grow tomatoes and peppers for a long enough period to bring them to harvest

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/eclectic/propagation/ (2016-04-27)
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  • From the Mailbag: Do I need to isolate open-pollinated corn? - The Westside Gardener
    hybrid corn I do it all the time If you want to save seed for planting in the future then you need to either isolate by space I think 75 100 feet is considered adequate isolate by time stagger the plantings so the silk is drying down on one variety before the tassels come up on the other or plant in alternate years Corn seed should be good for at

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2006/mailbag_corn.html (2016-04-27)
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