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  • Windsor's Rescue Squads Part 6 "The Saulsbury" - WindsorFire.com
    a former chief s car converted into a rescue squad by the Windsor Fire Department Shops the 2000 Saulsbury Spartan now running out of Station 3 would seem absolutely humongous about the size of one of Windsor s old single bay clapboard fire stations The entire four man crew of Windsor s original life saving squad could practically live inside Rescue 3 s spacious cab Today Rescue 3 probably carries more gear in its numerous external equipment compartments than could be found on all of Windsor s rigs in the late 1920s And what to make of the collapsible light tower that rises out of the squad s roof the big self contained power generator and modern rescue tools like the Jaws of Life In those thrilling days of yesteryear firefighters thought nothing of rushing headlong into smoke filled buildings without breathing apparatus of any kind Real firemen it was believed back then had leather lungs Just like life itself firefighting has gotten a lot more complicated and thankfully safer since Windsor formed its first rescue squad in 1933 Delivered to Windsor Fire Rescue in the late summer of the first year of the new millennium Rescue 1 as it was originally lettered was built by Saulsbury Fire Apparatus in Preble N Y just off Interstate 81 about 20 miles south of Syracuse Sam Saulsbury started selling fire equipment just after the Second World War In the late 1950s he designed and built a tanker for the Preble Fire Department of which he was then Chief So solid was the basic design that other fire companies in the area asked Sam to build fire trucks for them too The rest of course is history Saulsbury Fire Equipment s first plant was in Tully N Y just up the road from

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/windsors-rescue-squads-part-6-the-saulsbury/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Windsor's Rescue Squads Part 5 - Tilt-Cab Fords - WindsorFire.com
    side by side atextra alarm fire on College Ave 1989 A A A Purchased in the mid 1960s and early 70s Windsor s two rescue squad trucks were due for replacement as the 1980s began Squad 1 s 1967 Chevrolet and Squad 2 s 1970 Fargo had been running hard for a decade or more Squad 1 out of Station 4 on College Ave and Squad 2 out of Station 2 on Walker Rd The Windsor Fire Department acquired two new heavy rescue trucks in the mid 1980s Both were on Ford tilt cab C Series chassis with large fully enclosed rear entrance walk in bodies and numerous exterior equipment compartments Delivered in 1984 and 1986 both were powered by diesel engines and painted the trendy new lime yellow color widely adopted by fire departments all over North America since the 1970s Designed and constructed under the supervision of Chief of Apparatus Mike Koehl the first of these new heavy rescue units was placed in service as Squad 2 at Station 2 in the spring of 1984 The tall rectangular rear body with right side door and high mounted side windows was built by truck body builder Wilcox Bodies A second almost identical unit with Dependable body was delivered two years later Designated Squad 4 the 1986 Ford heavy rescue unit was placed in service at College Ave station Squad 2 covered the east side of the city and Squad 4 the west side with Ouellette Avenue as the dividing line between response districts The big yellow rescue squads with aerodynamic light bars and cat s eye flashing red lights between the headlights responded to all box and structural alarms in the city Both squads could be found on the fireground at major fires or other emergencies Late in its

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/windsors-rescue-squads-part-5-tilt-cab-fords/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Windsor's Rescue Squads Part 4 - WindsorFire.com
    s rescue squad had always responded to alarms out of the W F D s Headquarters Station on Pitt St E in the city s downtown business area While handy to the city core this location resulted in long runs to the extreme east and west sides of the continually growing city In the mid 1960s Fire Chief Harold Coxon and his senior officers made the decision to form a second rescue squad to reduce response times to alarms in the west end of the city A 1967 Chevrolet two ton cab and chassis was purchased and a medium sized canopy style rescue body designed by the resourceful W F D shops was constructed and mounted on this new chassis Lettered Squad No 1 the handsome new rescue unit was placed into service at Station No 4 on College Avenue east of Huron Church Rd in the latter part of July 1968 At the same time Salvage No 1 the 1957 Fargo squad known as the bug was transferred from the Pitt St hall to Station 2 on Walker Rd to provide similarly improved coverage for the east side of the city Depending on the location of the alarm east or west of Ouellette Avenue one of these two Rescue Squads responded to alarms in the central part of the city After little more than a year in service the rear roof canopy of the 67 Chevrolet squad was raised to provide more headroom for the crew riding back there The most distinctive feature of Squad No 1 however was the big Aurora Borealis warning light mounted on the cab roof The only one of its kind in Canada and forerunner to the emergency vehicle light bars that came later this unique light was a gift to Chief Coxon from

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/windsors-rescue-squads-part-4/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Windsor's Rescue Squads Part 3 - "The Bug" (continued) - WindsorFire.com
    Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles Windsor s Rescue Squads Part 3 The Bug continued in WFRS Apparatus Histories 7 May 2007 A A A After nearly 17 years of hard urban fire service The Bug was simply wearing out The fleet footed 1940 Ford had already been through two flathead V8 engines and repair parts were becoming difficult to obtain So in late 1956 plans were drawn up for a replacement vehicle A thorough inspection of Salvage No 1 better known by members of the Windsor Fire Department as The Bug by Chief of Apparatus Romeo J Nantais revealed that the truck s original body designed and build by his predecessor Arthur Flatray was still in remarkably good condition A decision was made to remodel and modernize the old body and transfer it to a new chassis In the spring of 1957 a new Fargo D 500 three ton cab and chassis was purchased from Abbey Gray Ltd the Chrysler Plymouth Fargo dealer on Goyeau St at Elliott St E and delivered to the Windsor Fire Department shops on Richmond St next door to Fire Station No 2 In mid June of 1957 the 40 Ford made its last run out of the W F D headquarters station on Pitt St E Its rescue and salvage gear was removed and packed into the open rear body of Hose No 1 a 1942 GMC hose truck which would temporarily serve as The Bug while Salvage No 1 was being rebuilt The compartmented rear body was removed from the chassis of the 1940 Ford and a steel canopy style roof with small side windows and open at the rear was welded into place above it By late summer the redesigned shop built body had been installed on the new Fargo chassis The portable Eastman turret nozzle from the 1940 Ford was mounted on the right hand side of the rear body A shiny new bell was mounted on the right front fender and a big Sterling siren on the other Like its predecessor the new truck was lettered Salvage No 1 on its cab doors with Windsor painted on the sides of its broad hood Including the Fargo chassis the impressive new salvage truck had cost the department just 4 039 After thorough testing and driver training the new salvage squad rig was placed into service at the Pitt St headquarters station on September 30 1957 Still nicknamed The Bug the Fargo flying manpower squad responded to all box alarms and extra alarm fires all over the city Its four man crew now rode safely inside the tall rear canopy where they were protected from the elements a vast improvement over the original Bug s wide open hang on for dear life rear deck with its largely ineffective canvas windbreaker Following the annexation of Riverside Sandwich East and portions of Sandwich West the previous year a new Chevrolet rescue squad truck was placed in service at Station 4 in the city s

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/windsors-rescue-squads-part-3-the-bug-continued/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Windsor's Rescue Squads Part 2 - "The Bug" - WindsorFire.com
    was known as the W F D s Service Car later redesignated Salvage No 1 This colorful chapter in Windsor Fire Department history began in 1930 when Master Mechanic Arthur Flatray and his small workshop crew converted an accident damaged 1929 Dodge assistant chief s car into a special service unit Placed into service that depression year Service Car No 1 carried a quantity of canvas tarpaulins which were spread over goods or furniture at fire scenes to minimize water and smoke damage and insurance losses The Service Car fulfilled the same basic role as the independent Fire Insurance Patrols found in all large U S and a few Canadian cities in the first half of the last century Totally separate from the Fire Department the privately funded Fire Insurance Patrol companies worked side by side with firefighters at fire scenes particularly in commercial buildings and stores Responding from their own quarters the Insurance Patrolmen also rode on their own rescue squad style rigs Ironically the last independent Fire Insurance Patrol in the U S ceased operation in New York City just last year after more than 170 years of continuous operation In addition to a large supply of salvage covers mops buckets and other cleanup tools Service Car No 1 was equipped with a large three inlet Eastman turret pipe mounted behind the driver s seat Two big cowl mounted searchlights provided extra illumination at night fire scenes After nearly a decade of service the now outdated 1929 Dodge was clearly due for replacement In late 1939 Service Car No 1 was traded in on a new 1940 Ford two ton truck chassis Master Mechanic Art Flatray and his staff fabricated an all steel compartment type body for mounting on this chassis Three big portable floodlights and a fixed turret pipe were mounted on the truck s deck just behind the closed three man cab A Sterling 30 Sirenlight was mounted on the hood just ahead of the windshield The first closed cab apparatus on the Windsor Fire Department the gleaming new Ford Service Car was placed in service at the Pitt Street Station in late 1940 The driver and officer rode in the cab Three or four more firefighters rode in the rear hanging for dear life onto low chrome handrails A few years later a canvas windbreaker with celluloid windows was installed in the rear body to shield the men from the wind and cold The Service Car responded to all box alarms structural and extra alarm fires in the city It was a long run from Pitt Street out to the Sandwich East Township border on Tecumseh Road East and on a calm day your could actually hear that lusty siren as the Bug left the Pitt St hall The Service Car was one of the first vehicles in the department equipped with a two way radio so runs could be cancelled en route if the Service Car was not needed The origin of its colorful

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/windsors-rescue-squads-part-2-the-bug/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Windsor's Rescue Squads Part 1 - WindsorFire.com
    was organized to supplement temporarily depleted manpower during meal periods At that time it was common fire department practice to allow a certain number of firefighters time off for meals Far faster than horse drawn equipment and carrying up to a dozen men the Flying Manpower Squadron could speed to any part of the city to augment the men on the fireground The Detroit Fire Department placed its first Flying Squadron in service in 1908 utilizing a Packard squad car The Flying Squadron was typically made up of experienced firefighters with both engine and ladder company skills Over the next few decades these elite manpower units evolved into Rescue Squad companies manned by fire fighters specially trained in rescue techniques In addition to its supplemental manpower the Rescue Squad Car carried heavy rescue tools and equipment In larger cities the Rescue Squad accompanied pumpers hose wagons and ladder trucks to extra alarm fires but could be special called to any emergency such as motor vehicle accidents trench cave ins or building collapses With the introduction of pulmotors and other early resuscitation equipment in the 1920s the rescue squad took on a more focused life saving role The squad was routinely called out to gas leaks drownings or to revive citizens who may have collapsed or were having difficulty breathing Ironically Windsor s first rescue squad was literally formed by accident On the afternoon of January 18 1933 Fire Chief Clarence DeFields was responding to a fire call in his 1929 Studebaker coupe Turning from Dougall Avenue onto Wyandotte Street the chief s car was struck on its left side by a trolley car Chief DeFields was knocked unconscious but was back in his office the next day His car wasn t so lucky It was deemed too heavily damaged to repair and was written off But Arthur Flatray the Windsor Fire Department s talented master mechanic had the crumpled passenger car body removed from the chassis Within a matter of months his versatile workshop crew had converted the four year old Studebaker into the city s first Rescue Squad Car With a hand picked crew the Studebaker responded to alarms out of the Fire Department Headquarters Station at 254 Pitt St E Two prominent local doctors Dr W Porte Marshall and Dr C F Dunfield were appointed Attending Physicians on the squad The Border Cities Star reported that by early 1934 in its first year of operation the Rescue Squad had successfully resuscitated 35 of the 45 cases it had responded to In 1947 the outmoded well worn Studebaker was replaced by a new one ton Mercury panel truck which was converted into a combination Rescue Car and Ambulance by the workshop staff A big Sterling 30 Sirenlite was mounted on the right front fender The Rescue Car responded to all multiple alarms and was occasionally used to transport members of the department to and from their homes and area hospitals This service was discontinued in 1963 Still in excellent

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/windsors-rescue-squads-part-1/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Aerial Ladder Trucks - Part 8 - WindsorFire.com
    had passed since the Windsor Fire Department had purchased its last new aerial ladder truck a LaFrance 100 service aerial on semi custom International chassis delivered in 1967 The W F D s junior aerial a 1952 Bickle Seagrave 75 footer had been in service for nearly two decades and was due for replacement In 1980 Fire Chief Ken Stewart and Chief of Apparatus Mike Koehl drew up specifications for two 100 foot midship mounted service aerials While both were ordered from prominent Canadian fire apparatus manufacturers located in the same small town in Quebec the ladder trucks were built by two totally separate companies The first one was built by Pierre Thibault Ltd Although the company traced its roots all the way back to 1918 Pierre Thibault set up shop in Pierreville Quebec near Sorel in the 1930s Following the demise of Bickle Seagrave Ltd in 1955 and LaFrance in the early 1970s Thibault emerged as Canada s largest fire apparatus builder In November 1980 the writer accompanied Chief Koehl and Chief Stewart to the Pierre Thibault factory in Quebec for an in progress inspection of the new aerial truck which was taking shape on the shop floor Still in primer most of the aerial s rear bodywork had not yet been installed so mechanical components the engine turntable mechanism hoist and hydraulic system could be readily accessed and inspected for contract compliance Lettered Aerial No 4A on its cab doors the first of these two new aerials was delivered to Windsor in the early spring of 1981 After the requisite testing and crew training the handsome new aerial truck was placed in service at Fire Station No 4 on College Avenue near Huron Church Rd A virtual clone of the 1981 delivery the second new aerial arrived in Windsor in mid 1982 Lettered Aerial No 1A this aerial was built by Thibault s archrival Pierreville Fire Trucks Following a bitter feud within the Thibault family following the death of patriarch Pierre Thibault five of his sons left the family firm and set up their own fire apparatus company Pierreville Fire Trucks in a new factory in St Francois du Lac just across the river from Pierreville Painted lime green with gold leaf striping and lettering the two Diesel powered ladder trucks were virtually identical in appearance About the only way to tell the two trucks apart were the two big round red lights on the front of the Thibault s cab Both were built on Spartan custom cab forward chassis with five man canopy cabs Each had a midship mounted white painted four section 100 foot steel aerial ladder Dual sets of hydraulic outriggers stabilized the apparatus when the main ladder was raised Ladder beds were fully enclosed behind large equipment compartments on both sides of the apparatus Following several weeks of training Aerial No 1A was placed in service at Station 2 on Richmond St at Walker Road Years later for reasons that now elude us the

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/aerial-ladder-trucks-part-8/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Aerial Ladder Trucks - Part 7 - WindsorFire.com
    at work in a city park Quinn was amazed at the mobility the men in the bucket of their utility type elevating platform had the ease with which they could move up or down around and over objects Why Quinn thought couldn t his firefighters have this same kind of aerial mobility Quinn shared his observations with other senior members of the Chicago Fire Department who decided then and there to explore this novel concept Thus it was that in 1958 the Windy City placed the first firefighting elevating platform nicknamed Quinn s Snorkel into service sparking an aerial revolution Within a few years the elevating platform or Snorkel virtually revolutionized aerial firefighting in the United States and Canada Fredericton New Brunswick was the first fire department in Canada to place an elevating platform into service in 1960 Within a few years most major Canadian cities had added Snorkels to their firefighting fleets Windsor took delivery of its first elevating platform in 1971 Fire Chief Harold Coxon and Chief of Apparatus Melchior Mike Koehl had carefully studied all of the major types and makes of firefighting aerial platforms before recommending the purchase of one to Windsor City Council in the late 1960s Windsor s first aerial tower arrived at the new Fire Department Headquarters station on Goyeau Street late on the afternoon of October 21 1971 Ordered more than a year earlier it was built by the Aerial Tower Sales Division of Duke Lawn Equipment Ltd in Burlington Ontario at a contract price of 73 525 Mounted on a tandem axle Ford CT 900 chassis with three man tilt cab the 85 foot Hi Ranger Snorkel was also Windsor s first piece of Diesel powered fire apparatus In addition to its two section articulated boom of open lattice construction the aerial tower carried 240 feet of ground ladders The roomy basket was equipped with a prepiped monitor nozzle and a duplicate set of controls allowed the men in the basket to control movement of the tower Two sets of A frame hydraulic outriggers stabilized the big truck when the white painted boom was raised Unfortunately however this totally new kind of aerial apparatus was not warmly welcomed by all of Windsor s firefighters some of who shunned the strange looking truck and refused to even look at it R I P Snorky read the card on a big basket of flowers someone scored from a nearby funeral home and placed on the tower s rear step hours after it was backed into its stall for the first time But the skeptics were soon converted as the big machine demonstrated its incredible versatility as both a rescue vehicle and water tower in the weeks of intensive training that followed Within no time it seemed nobody wanted to climb an aerial ladder anymore Lettered Aerial Tower No 1 on its cab doors the Snorkel was placed into service at Windsor Fire Department headquarters in late November 1971 Six months were to pass

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/aerial-ladder-trucks-part-7/ (2016-04-24)
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