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  • What to do During & After an Earthquake - WindsorFire.com
    During After Emergency Management Civil Protection Act Emergency Management Ontario History of Canadian Disasters Severe Weather Power Outage Safety Tips Preparing for a Flood Basement Flood Handbook Preparing for Tornadoes Thunderstorms Be Ready for Winter Weather Public Education General Fire Safety Issues Building Owners When Disaster Strikes Hotel Fire Safety Home Fire Safety Outdoor Fire Safety Youngsters Fire Safety Fire Safety Fall Prevention for Older Adults Smoke Alarm Information Carbon Monoxide Information Sprinklers Translated Materials Firefighters Become a Firefighter In the Line of Duty Padre s Corner Prayers Creeds Thoughts Co op Students Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Spring 2012 Fall 2011 Spring 2011 Co op Photo Gallery WFRS History Apparatus Histories Fire Stations Histories Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles What to do During After an Earthquake in Earthquakes 29 Aug 2013 Click here to learn what to do during and after an earthquake PDF A A A Stay as safe as possible during an earthquake Be aware that some earthquakes are actually foreshocks and a larger earthquake might occur Click on the link above to learn what to do during and after an earthquake Share You may also like Earthquake

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/what-to-do-during-after-an-earthquake/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act - WindsorFire.com
    Essex Heat Alert Response Plan Earthquakes Earthquake Guide What to do During After Emergency Management Civil Protection Act Emergency Management Ontario History of Canadian Disasters Severe Weather Power Outage Safety Tips Preparing for a Flood Basement Flood Handbook Preparing for Tornadoes Thunderstorms Be Ready for Winter Weather Public Education General Fire Safety Issues Building Owners When Disaster Strikes Hotel Fire Safety Home Fire Safety Outdoor Fire Safety Youngsters Fire Safety Fire Safety Fall Prevention for Older Adults Smoke Alarm Information Carbon Monoxide Information Sprinklers Translated Materials Firefighters Become a Firefighter In the Line of Duty Padre s Corner Prayers Creeds Thoughts Co op Students Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Spring 2012 Fall 2011 Spring 2011 Co op Photo Gallery WFRS History Apparatus Histories Fire Stations Histories Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act in Emergency Preparedness 29 Aug 2013 Click here to read the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act A A A Share You may also like History of Canadian Disasters 29 Aug 2013 City of Windsor Emergency Response Plan 19 Aug 2013 Canadian Red Cross Disaster Management 19 Aug 2013 Emergency Management Ontario 29 Aug

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/emergency-management-and-civil-protection-act/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Emergency Management Ontario - WindsorFire.com
    Extreme Heat Windsor Essex Heat Alert Response Plan Earthquakes Earthquake Guide What to do During After Emergency Management Civil Protection Act Emergency Management Ontario History of Canadian Disasters Severe Weather Power Outage Safety Tips Preparing for a Flood Basement Flood Handbook Preparing for Tornadoes Thunderstorms Be Ready for Winter Weather Public Education General Fire Safety Issues Building Owners When Disaster Strikes Hotel Fire Safety Home Fire Safety Outdoor Fire Safety Youngsters Fire Safety Fire Safety Fall Prevention for Older Adults Smoke Alarm Information Carbon Monoxide Information Sprinklers Translated Materials Firefighters Become a Firefighter In the Line of Duty Padre s Corner Prayers Creeds Thoughts Co op Students Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Spring 2012 Fall 2011 Spring 2011 Co op Photo Gallery WFRS History Apparatus Histories Fire Stations Histories Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles Emergency Management Ontario in Emergency Preparedness 29 Aug 2013 Click here to visit Emergency Management Ontario A A A Share You may also like City of Windsor Emergency Response Plan 19 Aug 2013 Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act 29 Aug 2013 History of Canadian Disasters 29 Aug 2013 Canadian Red Cross Disaster Management 19 Aug 2013

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/emergency-management-ontario/ (2016-04-24)
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  • History of Canadian Disasters - WindsorFire.com
    Heat Windsor Essex Heat Alert Response Plan Earthquakes Earthquake Guide What to do During After Emergency Management Civil Protection Act Emergency Management Ontario History of Canadian Disasters Severe Weather Power Outage Safety Tips Preparing for a Flood Basement Flood Handbook Preparing for Tornadoes Thunderstorms Be Ready for Winter Weather Public Education General Fire Safety Issues Building Owners When Disaster Strikes Hotel Fire Safety Home Fire Safety Outdoor Fire Safety Youngsters Fire Safety Fire Safety Fall Prevention for Older Adults Smoke Alarm Information Carbon Monoxide Information Sprinklers Translated Materials Firefighters Become a Firefighter In the Line of Duty Padre s Corner Prayers Creeds Thoughts Co op Students Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Spring 2012 Fall 2011 Spring 2011 Co op Photo Gallery WFRS History Apparatus Histories Fire Stations Histories Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles History of Canadian Disasters in Emergency Preparedness 29 Aug 2013 Click here to visit The Canadian Encyclopedia for a History of Canadian Disasters A A A Share You may also like Emergency Preparedness 1 May 2015 Canadian Red Cross Disaster Management 19 Aug 2013 Emergency Preparedness 19 Aug 2013 Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act 29 Aug 2013

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/history-of-canadian-disasters/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Severe Weather - WindsorFire.com
    make a funnel cloud at the rear base of a thunder cloud often behind a curtain of heavy rain or hail Tornadoes are violent windstorms characterized by a twisting funnel shaped cloud which forms at the base of cloud banks and points towards the ground Tornadoes usually move over the ground at anywhere from 20 to 90 km h and often travel from the southwest to the northeast They are erratic and can change course suddenly It is not a good idea to chase tornadoes Generally speaking May to September are prime tornado months Tornadoes usually hit in the afternoon and early evening but they have been known to strike at night too Canada has several high risk areas including Alberta southern Ontario southwestern Quebec and a band of land which stretches from southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba through to Thunder Bay Ontario There are also tornado zones in the interior of British Columbia and in western New Brunswick Things to do in a tornado If you live in one of Canada s high risk areas or zones you should listen to your radio during severe thunderstorms As a rule when Environment Canada issues a tornado warning radio stations broadcast it immediately If you hear that a tornado warning has been issued for your area take cover immediately If you are at home go to the basement or take shelter in a small interior ground floor room such as a bathroom closet or hallway Failing that protect yourself by taking shelter under a heavy table or desk In all cases stay away from windows and outside walls and doors If you are at the office or in an apartment building take shelter in an inner hallway or room ideally in the basement or the ground floor Do not use the elevator and stay away from windows Avoid buildings such as gymnasiums churches and auditoriums with freespan roofs These roofs do not have supports in the middle and may collapse if a tornado hits them If you are in one of these buildings take cover under a sturdy structure Do not get caught in a car or mobile home More than 50 per cent of all deaths from tornadoes happen in mobile homes Take shelter elsewhere such as a building with a strong foundation If no shelter is available then lie down in a ditch away from the automobile or mobile home If you are driving and spot a tornado in the distance try to get to a nearby shelter If the tornado is close by get out of your car and take cover in a low lying area or even under an underpass on a freeway Crawl right up the bank to just under the road of the overpass If a tornado seems to be standing still then it is either travelling away from you or heading right for you In all cases get as close to the ground as possible protect your head and watch out for flying debris Small objects such as sticks and straws can become lethal weapons when driven by a tornado s winds Severe thunderstorms lightning heavy rain and hail A thunderstorm develops in an unstable atmosphere when warm moist air near the earth s surface rises quickly and cools The moisture condenses to form rain droplets and dark thunder clouds called cumulonimbus clouds These storms are often accompanied by hail lightning high winds heavy rain and tornadoes Thunderstorms are usually over in an hour although a series of thunderstorms can last for several hours Lightning The air is charged with electricity during a thunderstorm The most striking sign of this is lightning Bolts of lightning hit the ground at about 40 000 kilometres per second so fast that the lightning appears to be a single main bolt with a few forks when actually the opposite is true The main bolt is a whole series of lightning strikes all taking the same path but at such a pace that the eye cannot distinguish between them To estimate how far away the lightning is count the seconds between the flash of lightning and the thunderclap Each second is about 300 metres If you count fewer than five seconds take shelter immediately Lightning is near and you do not want to be the tallest object in the area At the office or house If indoors stay there but away from windows doors fireplaces radiators stoves sinks bathtubs appliances metal pipes telephones and other materials which conduct electricity You can use a cellular telephone Unplug radios and televisions Do not go out to rescue the laundry on the clothesline as it conducts electricity Outside Take shelter in a building or depressed area such as a ditch or a culvert but never under a tree Do not ride bicycles motorcycles or golf carts or use metal shovels or golf clubs as they conduct electricity If swimming or in a boat get back to shore immediately If caught in the open do not lie flat but crouch in the leap frog position and lower your head If you are in a car stay there but pull away from trees which might fall on you Heavy rain A heavy rain fall can result in flooding This is particularly true when the ground is still frozen or already saturated from previous storms Floods may also result if a heavy rain coincides with the spring thaw If you know there is flooding or the possibility of flooding in your area keep your radio on to find out what areas are flooded what areas are likely to be flooded as well as what roads are safe where to go and what to do if the local emergency team asks you to leave your home Generally speaking it is a good idea to avoid driving through flooded roads and underpasses The water may be a great deal deeper than it looks and you could get stuck You may also want to avoid crossing bridges if the

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/severe-weather/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Power Outage Safety Tips - WindsorFire.com
    History Apparatus Histories Fire Stations Histories Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles Power Outage Safety Tips in Severe Weather 12 Sep 2013 A A A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT FIRE SAFETY TIPS DURING POWER FAILURES When your power is out you may be introducing potential hazards to your home Please review the following tips and take extra precautions to make sure that everyone stays safe If you have any questions contact your fire department Candle Caution Use flashlights whenever possible If you must use candles take extreme care Candles should be placed in secure candleholders protected by a glass chimney Keep candles away from any combustible materials Place candles out of reach of children or pets Extinguish all candles when you leave the room or go to bed Avoid using candles in bedrooms and never leave candles unattended Matches and Lighters Keep all matches and lighters out of sight and reach of children preferably in a locked cabinet Shut Your Stove Off Make sure that all stove elements and ovens are OFF and that nothing has been left on top of the stove Electrical Generators Portable generators should be carefully placed outside to ensure that fumes do not enter the home Install a battery powered CO detector in your home Generators and hot exhaust gases should be kept away from combustibles Store fuel for the generator outside the home Keep the fuel in an approved container a safe distance away from your home and generator Refuel the generator only after shutting it down and letting it cool Follow the manufacturer s recommendations regarding use Smoke Alarms Smoke alarms electrically connected to your home s AC power supply will not work when the power is out unless they have battery back ups Find out what type of alarms you have in your home

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/power-outage-safety-tips/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Preparing for a Flood - WindsorFire.com
    Install check valves in building sewer traps to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home Know the elevation of your property in relation to nearby streams and other waterways and plan what you will do and where you will go in a flood emergency When a flood threatens If forced to leave your property and time permits move essential items to safe ground fill tanks to keep them from floating away and grease immovable machinery Store a supply of drinking water in clean bathtubs and in large containers Get out of areas subject to flooding This includes dips low spots floodplains etc During a flood Avoid areas subject to sudden flooding Even six inches of fast moving floodwater can knock you off your feet and a depth of two feet will float your car Never try to walk swim or drive through such swift water Do not attempt to drive over a flooded road STOP Turn around and go another way Keep children from playing in floodwaters or near culverts and storm drains After a flood Boil drinking water before using If fresh food has come in contact with floodwaters throw it out Seek necessary medical care at the nearest hospital Food clothing shelter and first aid are available at Red Cross shelters Use flashlights not lanterns or torches to examine buildings Flammables may be inside Do not handle live electrical equipment in wet areas Electrical equipment should be checked and dried before being returned to service Where can I find additional safety information Turn Around Don t Drown are literally words to live by This slogan highlights the nationwide flood safety public awareness campaign to help reduce flood related deaths in the United States The poster a Turn Around Don t Drown sign window sticker FLASH card and a NOAA National Weather Service flood safety brochure are also available online at http www nws noaa gov os water tadd Facts about Floods What is a flood and when do most occur A flood is the inundation of a normally dry area caused by an increased water level in an established watercourse such as a river stream or drainage ditch or ponding of water at or near the point where the rain fell Floods can occur anytime during the year However many occur seasonally after winter snow melts or heavy spring rains What are flash floods Flash floods occur suddenly usually within 6 hours of the rain event and result from heavy localized rainfall or levee failures Flash floods can begin before the rain stops Water level on small streams may rise quickly in heavy rainstorms especially near the headwaters of river basins Heavy rains can also cause flash flooding in areas where the floodplain has been urbanized What are other causes of flooding in Michigan Ice jams and dam failures can also cause both flooding and flash flooding Are people killed as a result of floods Many people are killed by flash floods when

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/preparing-for-a-flood/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Basement Flood Handbook - WindsorFire.com
    Outage Safety Tips Preparing for a Flood Basement Flood Handbook Preparing for Tornadoes Thunderstorms Be Ready for Winter Weather Public Education General Fire Safety Issues Building Owners When Disaster Strikes Hotel Fire Safety Home Fire Safety Outdoor Fire Safety Youngsters Fire Safety Fire Safety Fall Prevention for Older Adults Smoke Alarm Information Carbon Monoxide Information Sprinklers Translated Materials Firefighters Become a Firefighter In the Line of Duty Padre s Corner Prayers Creeds Thoughts Co op Students Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Spring 2012 Fall 2011 Spring 2011 Co op Photo Gallery WFRS History Apparatus Histories Fire Stations Histories Firefighting Traditions Misc History Articles Basement Flood Handbook in Severe Weather 12 Sep 2013 Click here to download the Basement Flood Handbook PDF A A A This handbook provides information on how you can reduce your chances and your neighbours chances of having basement flooding It also provides some background information and descriptions of municipal sewer and stormwater management issues that have led to basement flooding problems It is our hope that this handbook will provide useful guidance to any homeowner who would like to reduce their chances of having basement flooding Share

    Original URL path: http://www.windsorfire.com/basement-flood-handbook/ (2016-04-24)
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